21 September 2017

Maritime Crime and the Effects on Growth and Development in the African Region

As part of the Danish Maritime Days 2014, Risk Intelligence, the Danish Shipowners’ Association and Oceans Beyond Piracy hosted a seminar titled ‘Maritime Crime and the Effects on Growth and Development in the African Region’. 

Speakers

The following speakers presentations can be downloaded using the link in the right hand corner of this page:

Mr. Hans Tino Hansen, Risk Intelligence
Status on the current security situation in East and West Africa
Mr. Peter Hinchliffe, International Chamber of Shipping
Industry’s and Seafarers’ Long Term Vision for Maritime Security
Mr Francois Morizur, Bourbon Interoil, Nigeria
Industry’s and Seafarers’ Long Term Vision for Maritime Security
Mr. Peter Swift , Maritime Piracy Humanitarian Response Programme
Industry’s and Seafarers’ Long Term Vision for Maritime Security
Ms. Nancy Karigithu, Kenya Maritime Authority
The political and economic landscape in Africa now and in the near future: The elements that will affect Africa’s maritime development in the years to come 

Main Findings

1. Although the success of Somali pirates have been significantly reduced, they still have the intent and capability to resume their activities if the international community begins to decrease its naval efforts and/or the shipping industry begins to reduce vessel self-protection measures. Therefore, a continued level of commitment across stakeholders to counter-piracy measures needs to be defined until the root causes of piracy have been addressed.

2. Compared to Somalia, West Africa poses very different challenges to regional governments, the international community and the maritime industry. Various measures were identified for different stakeholders and it was emphasized that West African governments will have to identify their main concerns and pull the necessary expertise rather than being pushed towards solving problems identified by agencies and organizations from outside the region.

3. Lessons learned identified by coastal states, the international community and the maritime industry active in addressing maritime crime and piracy are being shared among stakeholders and applied in new areas according to local needs.

4. Maritime nations should use diplomatic tools to influence and underline positive developments and ensure that international and regional priorities are aligned. In the short term, this includes industrial and governmental cooperation on public private partnerships, such as MTISC, to make practical progress. In the longer term, all stakeholders should cooperate to promote the blue economy in Africa. 

Executive Summary

80 experts from the maritime sector, governments, international organizations, navies, NGOs and academia participated in the seminar where they discussed the challenges of doing business and creating economic growth in Africa caused by maritime crime. Key speakers included representatives from Risk Intelligence, the International Chamber of Shipping, Bourbon Interoil, the Maritime Piracy Humanitarian Response Programme, the African Union, Chatham House, Kenya Maritime Authority, EU, the International Maritime Organization, Oil Companies International Marine Forum, Oceans Beyond Piracy, Copenhagen University and the Royal Danish Navy.

A full list of speakers and some of their presentations can be downloaded using the link in the right hand corner of this page.

A main theme of the seminar was to explore what a continued commitment by the international community, regional countries and the maritime industry to maritime security in Africa could look like. Overall objectives and concrete ideas that these stakeholders may take to contribute to continued improvements in the joint efforts against maritime crime were developed.

The format included presentations, interactive scenario development sessions and a moderated panel discussion with questions from the audience. 

Rationale and objectives

Piracy and armed robbery are some of the most serious security challenges to the global maritime industry, calling for a collective and holistic response by the maritime community. A main goal for the seminar was hence to identify concrete actions that could contribute to increased maritime security in Africa.

Stakeholders and representatives from the private and public sectors were invited to define their visions based upon the perspectives of African countries, the maritime industry and seafarers. Through expert presentations, interactive scenario development sessions and plenary discussions, the seminar sought to develop initiatives where the global maritime industry, the international community and regional nations can work together to foster maritime security and at the same time act as a catalyst for further growth and development in the African region.